Tag Archives: Security

YouTuber builds glitter bomb that farts on unsuspecting package thieves

Rober wanted to be able to film the entire incident as it unfolded. The result is an over-engineered bait package that took six months to develop, and used motion sensors, a GPS tracker, and the combined wide-angle cameras of four mobile phones. It even used fart spray to ensure the thief would throw it away, so that Rober could recover and reuse it. – Jon Porter, The Verge https://ift.tt/2rR54eF
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YouTube tells impersonation victim: No, you’re not being impersonated

“I’m fortunate: I have a big megaphone to speak about this and am sure I can get this fraudulent account taken down,” Celeste Ng wrote. “But for someone with a smaller platform? They’re probably SOL. That’s wrong. YouTube should apply its terms of service, whether you have 90,000 followers or two.” – Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica https://ift.tt/2EglHbL

Permanent LTE exploits steer users to rogue websites

These attacks aren’t exactly trivial. You need to be physically close to your target, and sniffing hardware isn’t cheap (Ars Technica places the cost at roughly $4,000). Whoever uses the attacks will likely be either a committed thief or a surveillance agency. The problem, as you might have gathered, is that you can’t patch against this. Your best bet is to only visit sites using HTTP Strict Transport Security or DNS Security extensions, and that isn’t always easy. Although the like of facing an attack isn’t that high, there might not be a permanent solution until you’re using 5G. – Jon Fingas, Engadget https://engt.co/2yYxQ3a

What is WPA3, why does it matter, and when can you expect it?

WPA, an acronym for Wi-Fi Protected Access, authenticates devices with a pre-shared cryptographic cipher using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) protocol. Specifically, it employs a four-way handshake to prevent eavesdroppers from snooping on traffic passing between a Wi-Fi access point (like a router) and a Wi-Fi client (like a smartphone or laptop). Encryption prevents man-in-the-middle attacks that attempt to intercept data in transfer. – Kyle Wiggers, VentureBeat https://ift.tt/2Ivz32e

12,000 Social Media Influencers, Mostly Women, Exposed by Marketing Firm Data Breach

UpGuard’s researchers discovered the database in early January and were able to quickly linked it to the Octoly, a French company which maintains a virtual office based in Manhattan. Octoly’s Amazon server was publicly accessible, meaning virtually anyone could view its contents without a password. Securing the data proved challenging. Compared to most companies whose sensitive data has been unearthed in this way, Octoly was strikingly slow to respond. – Dell Cameron, Gizmodo http://gizmo.do/RofBd82
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