Tag Archives: internet service provider

Purdue stupidly decides to block Netflix, Hulu from classrooms

Allegedly, these sites, deemed “recreational” by the university, take away from the academic uses for the internet and experiments showed that banning these lower the broadband cost, which sounds great on paper. Unfortunately, this is an excuse by the Purdue administration to save money and not actually beneficial to the students or university. – Taylor Sturm, Netflix Life » https://ift.tt/2XmoyWK
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FCC Says Gutting ISP Oversight Was Great For Broadband

With many of the nation’s phone companies refusing to upgrade or even repair their aging DSL lines, cable giants like Comcast are securing a greater monopoly over faster broadband across huge swaths of the country. That in turn is resulting in higher rates and little incentive to improve terrible customer service. The telecom lobby works tirelessly to keep this status quo intact. – Karl Bode, MOTHERBOARD » https://ift.tt/2TfLUhF

House Democrats tell Ajit Pai: Stop screwing over the public

On Thursday this week, the Communications Subcommittee will hold a hearing about the impact of Pai’s net neutrality repeal on consumers, small businesses, and free speech. Witnesses who have been invited to testify at the hearing include former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, cable industry chief lobbyist Michael Powell (who is also a former FCC chairman), and representatives of Mozilla, Free Press, and Eastern Oregon Telecom. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica » http://bit.ly/2HZDcQ6

FCC struggles to convince judge that broadband isn’t “telecommunications”

Of the three judges, Circuit Judge Patricia Millett expressed the most skepticism of Johnson’s arguments, repeatedly challenging the FCC’s definition of broadband and its disregard for arguments made by public safety agencies. She also questioned the FCC’s claim that the net neutrality rules harmed broadband investment. Circuit Judge Robert Wilkins also expressed some skepticism of FCC arguments, while Senior Circuit Judge Stephen Williams seemed more amenable to FCC arguments. (Williams previously dissented in part from a 2016 ruling that upheld the Obama-era net neutrality rules. Now the same court is considering FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s repeal of those rules.) – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica » http://bit.ly/2Uzx6HI

What to expect from tomorrow’s big net neutrality court hearing

[W]hat may be the most likely shot at restoring net neutrality regulations will come from a petition against the FCC filed by several supporters of the dismantled rules. The case, Mozilla Corporation v. FCC, will be heard by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, and the court will decide whether the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, was within its rights to end the protections. – Colin Lecher, The Verge » http://bit.ly/2DLSeEW

FCC Republican claims municipal broadband is threat to First Amendment

[FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly] said that broadband providers run by local governments “have engaged in significant First Amendment mischief.” But O’Rielly’s only evidence to support his claim was the networks’ Acceptable Use Policies, which contain boilerplate language similar to the policies used by private ISPs such as Comcast and AT&T. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica https://ift.tt/2ABkb0Q

Wi-Fi branding to get a lot simpler with upcoming “Wi-Fi 6”

The 802.11 group produces dated standards every few years, most recently 802.11-2016, and then publishes amendments to these standards. The amendments are named alphabetically, and it’s these amendment names that have come to be used to refer to particular Wi-Fi technology. For example, the original 802.11-1997 standard was amended by 802.11a (54Mbit/s over 5GHz radio), 802.11b (11Mbit/s over 2.4GHz radio), and 802.11g (54Mbit/s over 2.4GHz) and, correspondingly, we see devices claiming to support 802.11a/b/g. Most of the other letters are also used to define additional features. – Peter Bright, Ars Technica https://ift.tt/2IyzTMt
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